Tag: family

The Lunatics of London & The greatest thing Seb: We actually sent this out as a Christmas card this year. We were kind of fed up with those happy-all-smiles Christmas cards that some families send out. We like to keep it real, yo. We’re a true, tight-knit family, full of love and affection for each other. (Thought I’d show you my pointy teeth that I’ve alluded to a few times, too… I told you they were scary.) I’ll spend this…

Wee-eee-eee… wee-um-a-way… Imbube… imbube… imbube… Last night, Eric, our blind cat, died. It was quick. He died at peace, asleep. Fourteen good, solid, there’s-a-good-cat, mouse-catching, rabbit-snarfling and pigeon-scaring years. Earlier this year Mango, Eric’s sister, died.¬†Eric himself is survived by his brother, Sammy, who is now the last surviving member of a very long line of beautiful cats that we’ve been lucky enough to rear or look after. Fourteen years is pretty good for a cat. I suppose I should…

A collection of photos from a birthday party this weekend. We descended upon the vaulted ceilings and croquet lawns of a large country house. We frolicked, drank tea and ate cake. And when the sun started doing down… well… that’s when things started to get crazy. Note: you can click each photo to visit my Flickr stream. There are further details there, and some funny annotations. More to follow… more balloons, and a cute little girl.

This is a continuation from a series of entries I wrote chronicling my childhood and teenage years. For some reason I got sidetracked — I wrote about ‘that tale from my teenage years‘, and before I knew it I was writing about my crazy relationships and sexual encounters. And then I got talking about The American. I often write as if I’m not affected by what unfolds — chilled, objective — but the truth is… I am. I am effected…

As I write this I’m tired. I’m just back from a family meet-up in London. I didn’t have enough sleep or coffee for the barrage of intimate and deeply-probing questions that septuagenarian Jewish females pitched at me over a four-hour period. Not only is it the number of questions but the ferocity and varied intensity at which they are delivered. Think of them like baseball pitches: high, low; fast, slow; straight and curved — you need to be able to…

My trip to the Faroe Islands was inspirational. It wasn’t a roller coaster of excitement. It wasn’t a sun-drenched getaway. I didn’t sleep a lot, nor did I feast on exotic fruits fed to me by sun-kissed maidens — in fact, all I ate was meat and potatoes. The Faroe Islands were educational. Eye-opening and and interesting. The Faroe Islands are unique in that they’re the smallest Western nation in the world. 45,000 people spread out across an archipelago of…