Tag: food for thought

Are you ready? Things are going to change around here. I’m not quite sure how yet, but I thought I’d get it out in the open – that’s what blogs are good for, after all. Things are… different. In my head. Thoughts aren’t lining themselves up in the same way they used to. It’s unnerving. It’s hard to explain, to you, when the right words won’t come — it’s a bit Catch-22 like that (the book, incidentally, still lays unfinished…

You probably know by now that I’m a bit of a pragmatist. I don’t totally discount the possibility of the paranormal, and pragmatism is a little too strict really, but I’m definitely of the scientific, that-which-can-be-proven mindset. I think there’s more to life than eight decades of faffing about and then decomposing in the ground. I just think it might be a little premature to assume we have a soul, an entity tethered to us in some indescribable, untenable way…

[In the olden days I used to always have punchy, interesting titles on my blog entries. Funny how that's kind of died down. I wonder if more people would read if I try to be sensational...] Yesterday I began an epic journey of introspection self-actualisation. I’m trying to digest 2009 by labelling the major milestones or stand-out points as good, bad or ugly. I actually made a list on paper (I was in the car), and I couldn’t actually come…

Just a little blog entry this morning! I’m still busy sorting through photos, which you might have begun to see on Flickr yesterday, but today I will finish that and post them up here on the blog! Lots of dorky-children photos (and one of a cute little girl I think) — and there’s one of the men in my family getting altogether too… frisky. But, in more important news — a robotic hand that has sensation! A robotic hand that…

For the first time in recorded history everyone has an equal chance of success. Or that’s what we like to tell ourselves. We gape at the powerful, unwaxed women that are directors and CEOs. We smile fondly at the emasculated house-husband that stays home to tend to the children. Sure, Spics and Polacks still man the mops and paint our walls, but everyone knows of at least one rich and successful Mexican or American Indian! They might not all be…

Yesterday I laid the ground rules for mysteries and why they have played such a huge role in the development of our society. Note how I say ‘huge’ rather than important or vital. Are these mysteries a good thing for survival? Better yet: is this incessant hunt for the unknowable a human-only trait? Did we evolve this love of mystery? The general argument goes like this: we like to see patterns. We attribute cause to every effect. We like to…